File Transfer Protocol (FTP)

FTP is an acronym for File Transfer Protocol. As the name suggests, FTP is used to transfer files between computers (client and server) on a network.

FTP uses a client-server architecture. Users provide authentication using a sign-in protocol, usually a username and password, however some FTP servers may be configured to accept anonymous FTP logins where you don't need to identify yourself before accessing files. Most often, FTP is secured with SSL/TLS.

How to FTP 
Files can be transferred between two computers using FTP software. The user's computer is called the local host machine and is connected to the Internet. The second machine, called the remote host, is also running FTP software and connected to the Internet.
  •     The local host machine connects to the remote host's IP address.
  •     The user would enter a username/password (or use anonymous).
  •     FTP software may have a GUI, allowing users to drag and drop files between the remote and local host. If not, a series of FTP commands are used to log in to the remote host and transfer files between the machines.

Timeline of IBM i

Here is a visual timeline of IBM i


Click on the image for the large version.
Right click for download options.


Source: Angus the IT Chap

Timeline of System i

Here is a visual timeline of System i
Click on the image for the large version.
Right click for download options.


Source: Angus the IT Chap

Display Authorized Users

The Display Authorized Users (DSPAUTUSR) command displays or prints the names of the authorized system users, in alphabetic order. The following information is provided for each user: the group profile of which the user is a member, the most recent password change date, whether the user profile has a password, and the text of the user profile.

Note:    While this command is searching for user profile information to display, another job cannot change user profiles (for example, with the Change User Profile (CHGUSRPRF) command). 


Restriction: The list of system users contains only the names of the user profiles to which the user of this command has at least read (*READ) authority. 

DSPAUTUSR SEQ(*GRPPRF) --> The group profiles are listed alphabetically in the group profile column. Members of that group are displayed alphabetically in the user profile column.

DSPAUTUSR SEQ(*USRPRF) --> This command displays the names of the system users in alphabetic order. For each user the following columns are displayed:
Group profile – the group profile of which the user is a member
Password Last Changed – the last password change date
No password – contains an ‘X’ is the user has no password.  Note that this means that the user cannot sign on
Level 0 or 1 Password - *YES, the user has a password for password levels 0 or 1 as required by the QPWDPVL system value
Level 2 or 3 Password - *YES, the user has a password for password levels 2 or 3 as required by the QPWDPVL system value
Netserver Password – *YES, the user has a Netserver password (enables Windows clients to access shared directory paths and shared output queues)
Local Pwd Mgt – *YES, the user profile password is managed locally (on the AS/400). When the password is not management locally, users cannot access the system by direct sign-on, but through other platforms.

IBM Supplied User Profiles

The following are the few user profiles shipped with the operating system

QSECOFR   - Security Officer
QPGMR      - Programmer
QBRMS      - BRMS profile
QSPL         - Spool profile
QSRV        - Service profile
QSYS        - System profile
QSYSOPR  - System Operator profile
QTCP        - Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) profile
QDFTOWN - For ownership purposes